Recently, The New York Times posted an article in their Arts section on the subject of Y architects should consider the implications of sound.

Those of us who are hearing generally take for granted the constant and incessant barrage of sound. Everything has a sound from the tap-tap of a keyboard to the gentle sound of fingers brushing against skin.   Even silence has a sound!

Sound affects all of our senses and can influence whether we, as humans, feel safe or exposed.

The force of someone else laughing can make a joke in a movie somehow funnier, and the sound of coffee beans being ground fills up a room, bounces of the walls, finds us, and energizes us without even the taste.

It is the feeling of sound, the reverberations off of walls, people, open space (such as on the High Line as the author of the NY Times article notes) that hits us somewhere in the gut and creates some sort of emotion whether good or bad.

It is impossible to deny the significance of sound in or around a space. If a restaurant is too noisy or working from home is too quiet (regardless of the white noise of the dishwasher running) we can’t find our thoughts. Sound is a teacher leading a class to a conclusion. And architects, we fully agree with The NY Times, should consider that conclusion, in the effectiveness of a space.


Check out The NY Times article here and let us know what you think in the comments!

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