How many times have we all opted out on going to party or dinner where we either knew few people, or were only on the good acquaintance level with most attendees, based on the “Small Talk Factor”?

When it comes to small talk, the effort is anything but small. In reality, the prospect of having to small talk all evening is exhausting.

This Ted Post on how to turn small talk into smart conversation, looks at Small Talk as an opportunity to have a truly interesting and out-of-the-box conversation.

They suggest instead of commenting on the weather (a go-to when suddenly found alone with someone we hardly know) to open up the discussion with a zany construct like: “They say that the weather was just like this when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. If that actually happened.”

A little absurd? Perhaps. But what is the harm, really?

When we think about it, we didn’t know any of our friends at some point or another. Perhaps someone of our nearest and dearest we met as children – and if you are still lucky enough to have friends you have know that long, all the power to you – but many of our friends we met later on.

How did you meet? Oh, you just “clicked.”

“Clicking” is a thing. Definitely. However, there are other factors at work. Depending on the day, the events of that months, a person can be in a better or worse mood and either feel like taking charge of social cues to start a “real” conversation or not.

Is it possible we don’t give many people the chance to have a meaningful conversation with us?

What we do know is that when you ask more in-depth, interesting questions, you get more in-depth, interesting answers back. Worth a try, no?

 


What do you think? Comment in the section below telling us how much more often you think you would find yourself engaged in meaningful conversations if you try Ted’s version of “Small Talk”?

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