We tend to think of ourselves as “plugged in” when we’re on our computers or smart phones. “Plugged in” as if we have a cord attached straight from the internet into our brains, feeding us an overwhelmingly steady stream of content.

Artist Rafaël Rozendaal, a New York-based net artist, proves that the internet is not as overwhelming as we initially discern. Rather, by removing all the content, we’re left with Mondrian-resembling images with aesthetically pleasing bold color palettes.

In the past, Rozendaal created web-based interactive artworks, the domain names of which he then sold to art collectors.

Recently, Rozendaal decided to take a few of his favorite screen shots and make them spacial.

Using a Jacquard mechanical loom with a programmable punch card, Rozendaal brought to life websites we all use on the daily – Gmail, Tumblr, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Seeing these websites reduced to their interface designs, the simplicity is what jumps out at us. Just by removing the content, any viewer is struck by the comparison of the amount of time we spend on these websites reduced to a screenshot.

Rozendaal’s beautiful pieces seem both a monument as well as rebuke to content all at once.

One reminder we are left with when looking at these works is to remain present. Read content, devour articles, but remember to take in the beauty of what we have created as whole and in the details. Carry on from this attitude of “Plugged in” and function instead as active participants when using the internet.

 


What are your opinions on Rozendaal’s artwork? Let us know in the comments section!

View more images here: steveturner.la/exhibition/rafael-rozendaal

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